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Call for Papers: The Problem of Evil in Modern and Contemporary European Philosophy

For many, the developments and often dazzling breakthroughs of the modern sciences since the 19th century have sustained the hope that evil will find sociological, psychological and even neurological and genetic explanations. These explanations were looked to with the aspiration that they would eventually bring about measures which, without completely eradicating evil, would nevertheless significantly reduce the pain and suffering it causes. For others, however, such hope, inherited from the ideals of Enlightenment, has revealed itself to be a mere illusion. In their view, both human reality, in its moral, political and historical dimensions, as well as natural reality, seem to show that evil, in all or part, is irreducible to this hope and the “solutions” that it conveys. In this regard, it is well known that a certain number of 20th century philosophers and writers, amongst which Theodor W. Adorno, Hannah Arendt, Primo Levi and Elie Wiesel are assuredly the most famous, have developed their thoughts on evil with reference to the horrors of Auschwitz and the concentration camps. More recently, the term or notion of evil has attracted a great deal of attention, as George W. Bush, in the aftermath of 9/11, justified the U.S. intervention in Iraq by claiming the need to combat what he described as “the axis of evil”. Moreover, the important political upheavals of the recent years coupled with the numerous attacks perpetrated by Al-Qaeda, ISIL and other groups labeled as terrorists have only but maintained this focus.

In this context, it is not surprising that philosophers, theologians and thinkers have undertaken to pursue and to expand their reflections on evil. For some of them, such reflections had to take the form of a re-examination of the major milestones of the philosophical view since Kant who, as is well-known, once claimed in his famous writing on religion that evil is a propensity (ein Hang) that has its origin within human reason itself. According to Susan Neiman (2002), Peter Dews (2006) et other commentators, this view combined with the responses and critics it received from philosophers such as Fichte, Schelling, Hegel, Nietzsche, Heidegger Bataille, Lacan, Ricoeur as well as the above mentioned philosophers, lead to defining the terms of an understanding that would really do justice to what many believe is the unfathomable, abysmal, even enigmatic or banal character of evil.

This conference in intended as an opportunity to revisit and to examine anew the terms around which the different views of evil have been defined from Kant to contemporary European post-Kantian philosophy. In this framework, several themes and sub-themes may be addressed, among which:

  • The notion of evil in the work of one of the above mentioned philosophers.
  • The problem of the origins of evil in Kant and in the works of post-Kantian philosophers.
  • The different dimensions of evil (metaphysical, physical, moral, political)
  • The connection between evil, freedom and the will.
  • The notion of evil and the issue of the theodicy.
  • The differences and similarities between the notion of evil in Kant and in the work of one of his predecessors (Leibniz, Spinoza, Descartes, Aquinas, Augustine).
  • The notion of evil in the work of a theologian who places his reflections within the Kantian and/or post-Kantian philosophical frameworks.
  • The experience of evil in the “disenchanted” and secularized” (post) modern world.
  • Psychoanalysis and evil.

The conference The Problem of Evil in Modern and Contemporary European Philosophy is organized by the Department of Philosophy at Bishop’s University (Sherbrooke, Quebec) and will take place on April 28th and 29th 2017. Proposals (in either English or French) must be submitted by email to Prof. Martin Thibodeau (mthibode@ubishops.ca) and Prof. Jamie Crooks (jcrooks@ubishops.ca) before December 31, 2016. Proposals must be 300 words long and accompanied by a short CV. Selected writers will be notified by January 13th, 2017, and will be asked to submit a 30 minute-presentation by March 17th, 2017.

We intend to publish some of the presented papers in a collective work. Therefore, we kindly request that you reserve your paper for this publication.

Call for papers – Appel à Contributions 20th Anniversary Meeting of the Symposium for Phenomenology “Play and Power” – “Jeu et pouvoir” July 4-9, 2016 PERUGIA, ITALIA

On the occasion of the 20th Anniversary of the Symposium for Phenomenology, we invite members for contributions to phenomenologies of play, in their critical, aesthetic, cultural, ontological and political dimensions. Although phenomenology arose within and as a European tradition, we seek to understand play and power today beyond Europe and Eurocentrism. We encourage contributions to the themes of play and power in light of political, geographical, legal, and symbolic power—notably, where power is presented as play, ludic and/or deadly serious, or where play reveals and disrupts the structures and boundaries of power.

With the focus on play and agonistics, we welcome contributions on

  • Play and power in critical philosophy and political theory
  • Play as aesthetic creation and destruction
  • Play and institution: power games and contestation
  • Play in community construction (and destruction)
  • Les jeux du pouvoir/power plays in geopolitics
  • Symbolic play, symbolic power
  • Play and power in and beyond “the West”
  • Play and race, play and color (lines, hierarchies, confluences)
  • Play and terror

We welcome discussion of the methodological difficulties posed to phenomenology by the multiple significations of play (play forging friendship and community, play in good and bad faith, play as critique—“just gaming,” play and normative praxis).

We solicit presentations in French and in English on topics of contemporary urgency that integrate the themes of play and power. Our hope is to foster open debates on these themes. Our concern is with phenomenology as critique, criticism, and indeed crisis. We are enquiring into the relevance of phenomenology to questions of contestation, agonistics, and contemporary realities in and beyond Europe. Presentations drawn from the many disciplines related to phenomenology (from sociology, psychology, critical history, and critical race theory) are likewise encouraged.

Please send an abstract of 800 words to symposium.phenomenology@gmail.com by February 1st, 2016, at the very latest. Acceptance notifications will be sent by March 15th .

Directors : Bettina Bergo (Montréal), Jens Vleminck (Ghent) & Ernst Wolff (Pretoria)

More info : https://symposiumphaenomenologicum.wordpress.com/program/

Call for Papers for Special Issue of Phaenex: Faces of Eros (Spring/Summer 2017)

Eros plays a central role in Western thought. In the philosophical and spiritual traditions, it usually refers to physical love and desire. Eros is a recurring character in the pre-Socratic cosmogonies, and it is the main impulse of the philosophical quest for truth in Plato’s Phaedrus. In the Symposium, Plato also unveils its fundamental ambiguity as half divine and half human, where the desire to merge the opposing sides involves beauty and ugliness, profusion and need. Eros is at the intersection of gift and possession, of radical openness and selfish desire, of interested disinterest and mystical transport, mixing clairvoyance and blindness. Thanks to the manifold nuances of the erotic-sensuous genius that fascinated Kierkegaard, eroticism both produces and dissolves several dimensions of human existence, sociality, understanding, and speech.

This Special Topics issue of PhænEx wishes to give a new impulse to philosophical reflections on this fundamental and ambiguous phenomenon, following an interdisciplinary perspective at the intersection of phenomenology, post-structuralism, and social sciences (psychology, sociology, sexology, anthropology, linguistics, etc.).

Submission Information

Submissions in both French and English are accepted, and all papers will be peer-reviewed. Paper submissions must be made directly through the journal’s website. Please follow the online instructions, guidelines, and stylesheet.

Submission Deadline: October 1st, 2016.

Please direct any questions to the Lead Editors:

 – Élodie Boublil (CNRS-ENS), elo.boublil[a]gmail.com

 – Chiara Piazzesi (UQAM), piazzesi.chiara[a]uqam.ca

Call for Papers: Annual Open Issue of PhaenEx (Fall 2016)

PhænEx is an electronic peer-reviewed journal affiliated with the Canadian-based Society for Existential and Phenomenological Theory and Culture. The journal provides an interdisciplinary forum for original research in theory and culture from existential or phenomenological perspectives, broadly construed. As examples, articles on the following authors are welcomed: Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, Kafka, Beckett, Husserl, Heidegger, Jaspers, Levinas, Malraux, Marcel, Buber, Frankl, Sartre, Camus, Merleau-Ponty, Beauvoir, Irigaray, etc. Papers from all disciplines and areas will be considered, following the interdisciplinary scope of PhænEx and EPTC.

Submission Information

Submissions in both French and English are accepted, and all papers will be peerreviewed. Paper submissions must be made directly through the journal’s website. Please follow the online instructions, guidelines, and stylesheet.

Deadline

Papers submitted by March 1st, 2016 will be considered for publication in this issue.

CFP: Hegel, Religion and Politics: Issues and Actuality

In the preface to the Phenomenology of Spirit (1807), G.W. F. Hegel stresses that his time is one of deep transformations affecting the very principles, beliefs and, more generally, the “worldview” (Weltanschauung) which have shaped the whole set of institutions constituting the Western world. Among those transformations, the ones altering religion and politics appeared to him as crucially important. It is therefore no surprise that, from his early theological writings to his late systematic works, Hegel wrote extensively about the disruptions that were profoundly transforming the manner in which his contemporaries understood the relationship between church and state, the divine and the human, and the sacred and the secular.

Certainly, more than two centuries have elapsed since Hegel explored the religious and political transformations that shook Europe in the aftermath of the French Revolution. However, in the last decades, several thinkers and philosophers have defended the relevance of Hegel’s religious and political philosophy. Indeed, although it has often been argued that Hegel’s religious and political thought appeared to be outdated by Marxism or by political liberalism, many philosophers now propose that it contains the conceptual resources needed to best understand the complexity of the diverse transformations that are affecting the relationship between politics and religion in the contemporary world.

The conference Hegel, Religion and Politics: Issues and Actuality is organized by the Research Center in Public Ethics and Governance at Saint Paul University (Ottawa, Ontario) and will take place on April 15th and 16th. Proposals (in either English or French) must be submitted by email to Prof. Martin Thibodeau (mthibodeau@ustpaul.ca) and Prof. Sophie Cloutier (scloutier@ustpaul.ca) before December 31, 2015. Proposals must be 300 words long and accompanied by a short CV. Selected writers will be notified by January 15th, 2016, and will be asked to submit a 30 minute-presentation by March 15th, 2016.